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#188206 - 05/04/05 10:15 PM Worship Drumming
bggowing Offline
Regular

Registered: 08/19/04
Posts: 16
Loc: Canyon Lake, California
How do you feel worship drumming is different (or the same) as secular drumming?
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One of God's drummers

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#188207 - 05/04/05 11:30 PM Re: Worship Drumming
yamahammer Offline
Guru

Registered: 07/23/04
Posts: 829
Loc: Yamaha USA
From my experience, drumming is drumming.The most important thing is to play what's appropriate for the song. A lot of Christian music is very contemporary, and reaches out to the masses more than traditional hymns. The Gospel gigs I've played were no different than the R&B gigs other than the lyrics really. The great thing about using electronics is the availability of voices like Timpani, Vibes, Bells...even Thunder when you need it without having to bring in a ton of expensive instruments.

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#188208 - 05/05/05 02:37 PM Re: Worship Drumming
bggowing Offline
Regular

Registered: 08/19/04
Posts: 16
Loc: Canyon Lake, California
I think with contemporary worship drumming the drummer has to be willing to take more of a back-seat role than in the secular world. Where in the secular world the drummer can be in the spotlight, in the contemporary worship setting that we do the drummer is more in the background.

The drummer in a contemporary worship setting has to be willing to give up the attention and be able to finesse the song to give it just the right amount of percussion without intruding into it.

You also have to give up your pride when you want to do some licks that you know will only draw attention to yourself instead of enhancing the song. But there are also times where the proper selection of a sound will have the effect of getting the congregation to truly enter into worship (agreeing with yamahammer).

An example: Be The Centre is a slow, mystical, Celtic sounding song. I used a standard drum kit initially on my DTXpress and kept time with the song. Nothing spectacular and the drums weren't intrusive but neither did they do anything to help deepen the song.

I then switched to the Big Reverb kit and used just a single kick beat and the foot close on the hi-hat. A simple change like that made all the difference in the song. The first time I tried it during service you could visibly see the difference in the congregation. It opened up the song and people told me afterward that hearing the lone drum made them feel transported to a more intimate place.

I can't wait until I get the DTXtremes so I can expand some of the effects that I'm using. One thing is for sure, our worship leaders LOVE the Yamaha e-drums that I'm using. A LOT less stage volume, more effect, and the ability to tailor the drum volume to the song without me having to worry about if the drum is going to sound as good hitting it softly.
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One of God's drummers

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#188209 - 05/09/05 09:17 PM Re: Worship Drumming
Stix Offline
Experienced

Registered: 01/06/05
Posts: 71
There are both similarities and differences between playing drums for secular vs worship music. Right from the start, the biggest difference is purpose. Secular music is built around entertainment and profit; christian music is built around message and praise. As already stated, the drummer fades from the spotlight in christian music, though there are opportunities to "show your stuff" in certain situations. Christian music also is more friendly to using the range of voices/instruments and kits on board the DTXtreme. Maracas, claves, bells, etc. compliment many christian pieces of music. One thing I've noticed is that most church musicians are pretty talented, and the practice environment is disciplined. This equates to an ability to work up new songs in a relatively short period of time. It's all good...

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#188210 - 05/18/05 03:27 AM Re: Worship Drumming
WhiteHat Offline
Newcomer

Registered: 05/18/05
Posts: 3
G'day,

I'm an aussie and new to the forums - I've been playing in churches for about 7 years now on acoustic kits but have recently bought a DTXtremeIIs and am itching to find out how it works out. I bought it because I live in an apartment complex and havn't been able to practice for the past 3 years without annoying the neighbours, there's also a space issue

because we have a fairly small church the e-kit will definately reduce the stage noise which will really add to our ability to control how the song flows. one thing that I'm concerned about is that now the drums have to be in everyone's foldback including mine - I'd rather not have to wear headphones to hear myself and am considering changing the foldback position from to my right to underneath the kit itself (because there's no bass drum to get in the way, the possibilities for moving things arround like that are greatly increased)

one thing I've also concerned about is the fact that with acoustic cymbals, you can build atmosphere in "quiet" parts of some songs by successive hits, building up and achieve different nuances of sound by the way you hit. wheras even though the DTxtremeIIs has three hit zones on two of it's cymbals, each hit merely restarts the same sound and doesn't build on the previous hit. so I'm considering putting acoustic cymbals in addition to the electronic ones.

as for how church drumming is different to secular drumming. I think the key thing is that secular drumming is a performance, whereas church drumming, especialy for "worship" songs needs to focus on both building atmosphere as well as helping the congregation to sing the song. I guess that also goes for any drumming where people are singing or dancing allong to it. it's no use doing a fantastic-sounding cross-rythmn if it confuses or distracts the people singing the song.

the cymbal problem that I mentioned above can be partially overcome with the DTXtreme kit because there's three cymbals so instead of doing an increasing roll on one cymbal you hit all three alternately or even assign cymbal soundes to the edges of tom pads or something. I think that although we're at the stage that e-kits are getting to be a viable alternative, they still have a long way to go before they can totally replace acoustic kits. having said that, the e-kits are still tools that, when used correctly, can really add something.

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#188211 - 05/18/05 03:40 AM Re: Worship Drumming
WhiteHat Offline
Newcomer

Registered: 05/18/05
Posts: 3
forgot to add:

having the mixer on the brain is a godsend. - even when outputing to mono (because we can't afford 6 DI's just at the moment) the drummer still has control over the mix! it's awesome.

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#188212 - 05/25/05 08:30 AM Re: Worship Drumming
drummerboyIIS Offline
Regular

Registered: 05/25/05
Posts: 10
Worship drumming, in my opinion, can be just like any other session of drumming. It depends on the style of worship music is being played. I started playing in church. I've played several styles of worship music like contemporary gospel which compares to Pop/HipHop/R&B,(usually with large choirs) Contemporary Christian(Praise teams)which compares to soft/classic rock/country and so on.
Each set depends on the venue you are playing in. Like here in Germany, there are many churches that are small and have an average of 80-100 members so an E-Kit is perfect because an acoustic kit will usually force everyone to play and sing much louder than necessary. My church is pretty big, about 600-900 on a good day and its ran by the Air Force. As far as playing, well let's say it will depend on your music director on how hammy you can get on a particular set.

dw

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#188213 - 06/10/05 06:29 PM Re: Worship Drumming
sarnie Offline
Regular

Registered: 06/05/05
Posts: 49
..the main problem i find in playing at Church, other than that weekends song selection is who else is ganna be there?

when i first started it was virtually just me and keyboards with the occasional flute or recorder etc..a bit weak on the ground for a heavy rock drummer. But things move on, now we have bass, the occasional electric guitar as well as youger!!! keyboard players...we can go from say 15 people, including the singers to just 2 of us and the singers, u just never quite know!!! Gotta say that commitment is now getting far higher and a good turnout is the norm now, across a wide spectrum o ages too.

u just cant please everyone all the time. Many want more contempory worship. the cotton buds (older Ladies) want the organ, u try to please all, but just gotta remember that, yes u r here to help the worship, but that u r here yourself to worship, the one true God

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#188214 - 06/10/05 10:32 PM Re: Worship Drumming
JoeMcc Offline
Enthusiast

Registered: 10/15/04
Posts: 380
Loc: Seattle Area
"the cotton buds (older Ladies) want the organ"

LOLOL

Same problem here but I won't go into it any deaper than that.

I will say...E-drums alone are a God send for our church building. It is an acoustic nightmare. Now if we could just get our sound guy to wake up.



JoeMcc


Edited by JoeMcc (06/10/05 10:32 PM)

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#188215 - 06/13/05 10:35 PM Re: Worship Drumming
Stix Offline
Experienced

Registered: 01/06/05
Posts: 71
WOW! I have to tell you about my experience this past weekend. I play for a church that owns the DTXtremeiis. We use personal monitors and headphones, which is way cool. This past weekend, we joined services with another church and I split the drumming responsibilities with their drummer. They have accoustic drums, so that's what I played. There is NO comparison! Period. End of Story. You cannot beat the flexibility of digital in being able to use different kits for different styles of music, control volume levels, and add unique percussion sounds. I'll take electonic over accoustical any day! If Yamaha will just fix the kick problem, I'll be the fan of the year!

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